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This page is my attempt to bring everything (I've found) on the internet about the infamous artwork to one place for the fans of the mural and the artists who created it.

Nothing on this page is mine except the top graphic. No copyright is implied or inferred. I used the mathematical form of the artwork title for the name of this page so as not to infringe upon any copyright(s) that may exist. If anyone wants anything removed, or specific credit given, please contact me at:
wetchange@yahoo.com

If you were lucky enough to see this public mural on the Lion Gas building at 9th & Chestnut between 1977 & 1981 before its demise to make way for the Southwestern Bell (now at&t) Tower, you know how beloved the artwork became despite its brief four-year existence.

Driving east on Market Street late in the afternoon with the sun boldly illuminating the artwork like a spotlight made the rush-hour traffic a little bit more bearable.

Before the advent of home computers and Photoshop, determining the shades of gray and the number of shades needed to pixelate the photo of an amazing aviator was, in itself, a monumental feat. Today, it would take less than five minutes and the paint could be mixed by computer input. That Charles Lindbergh was selected to be pixelated in a St. Louis artwork was not exactly surprising given the flyer's nearly century-long connection to St. Louis.

It is fortunate, for our posterity, that such wonderful wall art can live on in the digital world given the inevitable damage by the weather in St. Louis and the eventual life cycle of buildings used to display them. We will always have these photos and history.

Our thanks to the artists Robert Fishbone and his late wife, Sarah Lindquist, for these memories.

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        THE LION GAS BUILDING, once standing at 9th and Chestnut Streets.

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In May of 2009, a photography blogger wrote about seeing "Lindy Squared" with his grandfather 20 years earlier. His anecdote and curiosity led him to send an email to Robert Fishbone who, with his now late wife, Sarah Lindquist, painted the mural.

Some time later, the blogger received a reply to his inquiry and updated his blog. There are some photos and the backstory of how they got the idea and how they proceeded to creat "pixels" before there were home computers or Photoshop or digital monitors or TVs.

Here is a link to his blog:



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        A REINCARNATION, titled "Lindy Squared II", much smaller than the original, was located in St. Louis Centre, but when the downtown mall succumbed to financial loss, the artwork went into storage. According to the blog mentioned above, it was finally destined for the Missouri History Museum, but a facebook post, reproduced below, by Robert Fishbone puts that possibility to rest.

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        A COLLAGE SHOWING THE PROCESS AND PROGRESS.

In 2010, the St. Louis Business Journal wrote about the possibility of a Lindy mural becoming a reality, which was updated in 2015. Another article appeared in 2012 on a web page called Rallystl.org. This attempt, too, had no physical results

Here are links to those online articles.:



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        The now late Sarah Lindquist, left, poses.with some of the ideas that have been transformed into large wall murals with her husband, Robert Fishbone, at right.
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        The plan for "Lindy".
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        The paint..

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A sad day in 1981
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